Old Testament Elders

Old Testament Elders

Topic: Old Testament Elders
By Pastor David Cox

Taken from a white paper by David Cox written August 11, 1994

The New Testament does not lay down a whole lot of foundational teaching on elders (some, but not a lot). This is because the concept of “elders” is already defined in the Old Testament. The idea of elders comes from the tribes of Israel, where there is in this culture a profound respect for “older people”. This respect extends to giving them a place on administration and group decisions as well as weighing in on many matters.

Let me say that there is a difference between an older person and an elder. The difference is that an elder is a person who is respected because of HOW he lived his life. Basically hard work, good decisions, and faithfulness to the basic tasks of work, home, family, nation, and church is what defines a person as an elder. In the Old Testament there were not churches of course, but “the congregation” or the people of Israel in their religious capacity. Before this structure came to be though, the elders of a group of people saw to the religious affairs of that group. Job is an example that is without date, but very old. Yet without the tabernacle nor the temple, Job was worried about the religious state of his children. The is a good man being an elder. We see Cain and Able offering sacrifices for their family, and Abraham as well. This leadership in life is what makes the difference between an old man and an elder.

In time, God brought chosen leaders onto the scene, and while in a sense they replaced the elders as leaders, they really only became more focused leaders given over to the ministry of administration and leadership. They both received support the elders, and they ministered to the elders.

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Why People leave your church

Why People leave your church is my thoughts on why people leave your church. I also have added points on this topic that other people have made as to this same topic (links at the bottom). I am going to categorize these into more logical “groups” to try to direct our discussion. I will admit to both sides of this issue. First, you should not leave your church for just any reason. There should be loyalty to your church organization and to your pastoral team. Loyalty to your church organization is seen in weekly attendance, your participation, and your weekly tithing and giving above and beyond the tithe, especially when there are special needs. Your loyalty to your pastoral staff is seen by showing up early for the service and being ready. That is having slept sufficiently that you will be awake through the whole sermon, and if need be, having drunk 2-5 cups of coffee. Also, that you have eaten something so that hunger does not distract you or your family from the activities and teachings.


 

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How to transmit “morality”

In How to transmit “morality” we will explore some “secrets” of how to “transmit morality”, i.e. make real Christians.

Introduction for How to transmit “morality”

My idea in this topic is how do we truly make real Christians? In other words, we can easily offer incentives (like give-aways, esteem type rewards like offices and other “perks” to people to get them to attend and supposedly “be loyal”, but that is not making real Christians. The problem with these things is that their loyalty is “skin deep”, and as soon as somebody offers them something better, they jump. How to transmit “morality”

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